Georgetown, Round Rock open Mays Street extension

The Cities of Georgetown and Round Rock will celebrate the opening of the Mays Street extension with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Sept. 28 at 2 p.m. The event will be held at the Georgetown/Round Rock city limits sign on the new road, which is about a quarter mile north of Bass Pro Drive.

The 1.2-mile roadway, which provides a north-south connection from Teravista Parkway at Bass Pro Drive in Round Rock to Westinghouse Road at Rabbit Hill Road in Georgetown, was a joint effort by the two cities.

“This new roadway will provide another connection between Georgetown and Round Rock that will greatly benefit residents in both cities. The Mays Street extension is also a key economic development driver for properties along Westinghouse Road and will improve our ability to attract new commercial and office projects to southeast Georgetown,” Georgetown Mayor Dale Ross said. “When neighbors come together in partnership, great things like this project happen, and we appreciate the City of Round Rock working with us to help make this possible.”

The $6.4 million project was funded by the Georgetown Transportation Enhancement Corp., which promotes economic and community development by paying for streets and transportation improvements, in partnership with the City of Round Rock. Round Rock funded 27 percent of the project.

“We’re thrilled to partner with our neighbors in Georgetown in opening up this new roadway,” Round Rock Mayor Craig Morgan said. “This is regional cooperation at its best, and will give motorists an alternative to I-35 that benefits both communities.”

The four-lane arterial provides a new connection from Georgetown to a retail and commercial area in Round Rock along University Boulevard. The project will also help economic development efforts in southeast Georgetown, including a proposed office project that could include up to 550,000 square feet of flexible office space that is planned near the intersection of Mays Street and Westinghouse Road.

Georgetown City Council approved a construction contract for the project in August 2016 with Austin-based C.C. Carlton Industry LTD, and the company began construction in October.

Southwest Bypass Segment 1 groundbreaking Sept. 8

Update: The ground breaking for the Southwest Bypass segment 1 project in Georgetown will be at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 8. The ground breaking will be held at the driveway at I-35 southbound frontage road just south of SE Inner Loop. The event was postponed last week due to Hurricane Harvey.
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The City of Georgetown and Williamson County will break ground on a section of Southwest Bypass from I-35 to west of the Georgetown Railroad on Aug. 28 at 11:30 a.m. The project is part of two overlapping segments that will eventually tie into the City’s Southwest Bypass connecting Hwy. 29 at D.B. Wood Road to RM 2243/Leander Road, which is anticipated to open in 2018.

The ground breaking will be held at the driveway at I-35 southbound frontage road just south of SE Inner Loop.

The approximately half-mile segment will take approximately 12 months to complete. The second segment will connect Segment 1 to RM 2243/Leander Road. Construction on the second segment is expected to begin in summer 2018. The road is expected to be completed by early 2020.

The City is managing the project, which is being funded by Williamson County. Engineering firm HDR designed the project, which is being constructed by Jordan Foster Construction.

GoGeo bus service hits the streets Aug. 21

The City will celebrate the launch of its new GoGeo fixed-route and paratransit bus service with a ribbon cutting at noon Aug. 21 at the central transit hub at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. Eighth St.

GoGeo has four routes serving Lone Star Circle of Care, Wolf Ranch, the Rivery, City Lights Theatres, Southwestern University, the Georgetown Recreation Center, apartment complexes and other locations. Service hours are from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday.

Riders can use the bus at no cost for the first two full weeks of service, Aug. 21-Sept. 1. There will be no service Monday, Sept. 4, in observance of Labor Day.

An unlimited daily pass is $2 and an unlimited monthly pass is $30. Reduced fares are available for riders with ID who are disabled, veterans and active military, riders age 65 or older, or students. Children 12 and younger with a full-fare rider can ride for free. Monthly pass and credit card purchases can be made at the Public Library. Exact change is needed for a daily pass purchase on the bus.

GoGeo paratransit service in Georgetown for those who are disabled is scheduled by appointment. Go to GoGeo.Georgetown.org for information on applying for GoGeo paratransit service.

The transit system is funded by rider fares as well as funds from the City of Georgetown, Georgetown Health Foundation, and Capital Metro. To see routes and for more information, visit GoGeo.Georgetown.org.

City street maintenance projects begin Aug. 7

Street resurfacing on city streets with hot-in-place recycling is scheduled to begin next week. Additional street resurfacing projects including a double course surface treatment are also expected to begin later this summer on portions of SE Inner Loop, Maple Street, Country Club Road and Northwest Boulevard.

The work schedule can be affected by weather conditions, mechanical issues, and product availability.

For a complete list of streets and updates on the paving schedule, visit transportation.georgetown.org/2017-street-maintenance-projects.

City hosts open house for GoGeo ADA plan

The City will host a transit open house for the American’s with Disabilities Act plan related to the GoGeo fixed-route and paratransit bus service, which begins Aug. 21.

The open house will be July 13 from 4:30-7 p.m. in the Friends Room of the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. Eighth St.

A draft of the ADA plan and ADA eligibility application to qualify to ride the new GoGeo paratransit service is available online at gogeo.georgetown.org/accessibility.

Public input about the plan and application is being accepted and will be gathered at the July 13 meeting.

If you are currently riding the curb-to-curb service you will need to fill out an ADA Eligibility application to qualify to ride the new ADA paratransit service and qualify for reduced rate fares on the fixed-route system. If you do not qualify for paratransit service, contact the Office of Mobility Management (OMM) at mytxride.com or call (512) 369-6047 to discuss other transportation options.

For additional information and to learn about this new service, visit gogeo.georgetown.org.

CARTS service to transition to GoGeo bus service in August

The City of Georgetown is launching its first fixed-route bus system this August, which means some changes for the City’s current on-demand bus riders.

The GoGeo fixed-route bus and American’s with Disabilities Act paratransit service will hit the streets Aug. 21 with four routes meeting at a transit hub at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. Eighth St. The service will operate Monday-Friday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. within the service area.

If you are currently riding the curb-to-curb service you will need to fill out an ADA Eligibility application to qualify to ride the new ADA paratransit service and qualify for reduced rate fares on the fixed-route system. A draft ADA plan and application for the paratransit service is available online at gogeo.georgetown.org/accessibility.

If you do not qualify for paratransit service, contact the Office of Mobility Management, OMM, at mytxride.com or call (512) 369-6047 to get more information about transportation services in the area.

For additional information and to learn about this new service, visit gogeo.georgetown.org.

City hosts Airport Master Plan workshop June 6

The City of Georgetown is currently conducting an update of the Master Plan for the Georgetown Municipal Airport and will host a public workshop June 6 to gather public input.

The meeting will be from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Georgetown Communications and Technology Building, 510 W. Ninth St. There will be a brief presentation at 5:45 p.m.

There also is a Planning Advisory Committee meeting from 2 to 4 p.m. on June 6 in the same location that is open to the public to observe proceedings.

The Master Plan update will provide a blueprint for future operations and development of the Airport in our growing city.

For more information about the master plan update, visit airport.georgetown.org.

City hosts public meeting for Williams Drive draft final plan May 30

Georgetown residents, business owners and civic leaders are invited to join the Williams Drive Study project team Tuesday, May 30, for an open house meeting to review the draft final plan for the corridor.

Public participation in previous meetings, from the studying and analysis phases to the development of conceptual plans, has helped develop the draft final plan.

The meeting will be 4-7 p.m. in the Georgetown Health Foundation Community Rooms in the Lake Aire Center at 2423 Williams Drive, Ste. 101.

The focus of the Williams Drive Study is to create safe and efficient transportation options while integrating smart land use, community needs, and the future economic growth of the corridor. The Study is a partnership between the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization and the City of Georgetown.

For more information about the study and to sign up for email newsletters, visit transportation.georgetown.org/williams-drive.

Austin Avenue Bridges: Public Comment on Options by May 26

The City of Georgetown is seeking public input on options for repairing or replacing the Austin Avenue Bridges that span the north and south forks of the San Gabriel River. Public comments should be submitted on or before Friday, May 26 in order to be included in the official public record for the public open house held on May 11.

Deficiencies in the bridges that were built in 1940 were noted in Texas Department of Transportation inspection reports in 2013 and 2015. Since then, a project team has been studying the bridges and gathering public input on options to address the deficiencies. The project team includes City staff as well as firms with expertise in bridge engineering, historic resources, environmental impacts, landscape architecture, and community involvement.

The goals of the bridge project are to address the structural deficiencies of the bridges, improve safety and mobility, provide safe turning movements for traffic, and provide crossings that are safe for pedestrians, bicycles, and other non-vehicular traffic.

The Austin Avenue Bridges project team developed a list of 12 preliminary alternatives for the bridges representing a range of reasonable concepts. Based on feasibility and impacts to ecological, community, and historic resources, the project team refined the list to five primary alternatives for the bridges, which are listed as below.

During the construction phase in all of the options, one lane of traffic in each direction would be maintained. Options including bearing replacement would include nightly closures of the bridges.

1. No build: This option includes some maintenance work, but does not include replacement of the bearings or the concrete deck on the bridges. This option does not meet the goals of the project, but is required by the federal environmental review process. Cost estimate: $400,000.

2A. Pair of one-way bridges: This option would rehabilitate the existing bridges for two southbound traffic lanes and a turn lane and construct new 40-foot wide bridges for northbound traffic to the east of the existing bridges. The new bridges would include two vehicular traffic lanes and a 10-foot-wide pedestrian and bicycle lane. The bearings and the concrete bridge deck would be replaced on the existing bridges. This option meets most of the goals of the project. The construction duration estimate is 18 to 22 months. Cost estimate: $13.1 million. The estimated service life of this option is 30 to 50 years.

6A. Rehabilitation with pedestrian bridges: This option would replace the bearings and concrete bridge deck on the existing bridges and construct new 10-foot wide pedestrian bridges to the east of the existing bridges. This option meets most of the goals of the project except for turning or mobility improvements for vehicles. The construction duration estimate is 16 to 18 months. Cost estimate: $7 million. The estimated service life of this option is 20 to 40 years.

7A. Rehabilitation and widen bridges: This option would replace the bearings and concrete deck on the existing bridges and add new 33.5-foot wide bridge sections to the east of the existing bridges. The new sections would include a 10-foot wide pedestrian and bicycle lane. A vehicular turn lane would be added on the existing bridges. This option meets all the goals of the project. The construction duration estimate is 16 to 18 months. Cost estimate: $12.7 million. The estimated service life of this option is 30 to 50 years.

8. Full replacement: This option would demolish the existing bridges and construct new bridges with a vehicular turn lane and a 10-foot wide lane for pedestrians and bicycles. This option meets the goals of the project, but does not preserve historic features of the existing bridges. The construction duration estimate is 18 to 22 months. Cost estimate: $15.7 million. The estimated service life of this option is 75 years.

Maps showing schematic design concepts for the five primary alternatives as well as display boards and other information on the project are available on the project website at austinave.georgetown.org.

Public comment on these five alternatives can be sent to the Austin Avenue Bridges project team at austinave@georgetown.org.

Feasibility, engineering, historic, environmental, and community factors as well as input from the public, state agencies, and the Georgetown City Council will lead to further narrowing of alternatives for the project. Additional analysis will lead to a preferred alternative that will be presented at a fourth public meeting for the project expected in late 2017 or early 2018.

City to begin sidewalk, street projects in May

Updated May 9, 2017, at 11:20 a.m.

The scope of the Seventh Street project has been expanded to include additional gutter improvements. The additional work could extend the project’s expected completion to mid-June. Myrtle Street between Seventh and Eighth streets is expected to be closed until Friday, May 12. The additional work will then close Myrtle Street between Sixth and Seventh streets for approximately five days starting Monday, May 15.

Posted April 27, 2017, at 3:09 p.m.

Construction on several sidewalk improvement projects throughout the city will kick off May 1.

This is the first round of sidewalk improvement projects identified in the adopted Sidewalk Master Plan and funded in part by the road bond approved by voters in May 2015. Projects include American’s With Disabilities Act compliance and accessibility improvements throughout downtown and citywide.

Construction will be completed in phases, and the entire project is expected to be completed in late November.

Sidewalk improvements include:

  • Del Webb Boulevard and Whispering Wind Drive
  • Williams Drive and Woodlake Drive
  • Williams Drive and Wildwood Drive
  • Williams Drive and Shell Road
  • Williams Drive and Lakeway Drive
  • Williams Drive and River Bend Drive
  • Austin Avenue and Morrow Street
  • Austin Avenue from Morrow Street to Williams Drive
  • Eighth and Rock streets
  • Eighth Street from Church to Myrtle streets
  • Sidewalks in Founders’ Park

Seventh Street reconstruction between Church and Myrtle streets is also set to begin May 1. Work will include a new asphalt roadway with curbs, drainage inlets, and storm drains. Construction is expected to take 30 days weather permitting. Seventh Street will be closed intermittently for construction.

Smith Contracting Co. of Austin will complete both projects.

The City will also begin construction May 1 on the sidewalk along the southbound Interstate 35 frontage road from Leander Road to Hwy. 29. Patin Construction will complete the project, which is expected to be completed Nov. 1. The project was a council priority and is being funded through certificate of obligation bonds.

See a map of the construction projects with expected start and completion dates here: