Art Center and Marketing Campaign Receive Awards

art center dec-b1000The Georgetown Art Center and the City of Georgetown’s Most Beautiful Town Square in Texas marketing campaign were winners of statewide awards last month from the Texas Downtown Association.

The two Georgetown winners were named in the Presidents Awards Program at the TDA annual meeting in Granbury. The awards for Georgetown were in the category of cities with populations above 50,000 residents.

The Georgetown Art Center won in the Best Public Improvement category that recognizes excellence in public projects and planning in downtowns or commercial districts.

The Most Beautiful Town Square in Texas marketing campaign won in the Best Marketing Program category, which recognizes excellence in marketing of downtown or commercial districts.

The Georgetown Art Center opened in October 2013 in the first floor of the renovated historic fire station and city hall building at 816 S. Main Street. Architect Gary Wang designed the Georgetown Art Center as well as the adjacent outdoor plaza.

TDA awards-b1000The Most Beautiful Town Square in Texas marketing campaign began in 2011 and is used in a variety of marketing and tourism advertisements and promotional initiatives.

Georgetown Mayor Dale Ross announced the TDA awards at the City Council meeting on November 25. Pictured are Mayor Ross with Cari Miller, tourism and Convention and Visitors Bureau manager, and Eric Lashley, public library director.

Miller has used the Most Beautiful Town Square in Texas trademark in a variety of advertisements and marketing collateral for the Georgetown Convention and Visitors Bureau. Lashley helped to coordinate the renovation of the Georgetown Art Center and is on the advisory board for Georgetown Art Works, the arts nonprofit that operates the Art Center.

COG_MostBeautifulLogo_BlueThe Texas Downtown Association is an independent, statewide nonprofit organization comprised of 430 members involved in downtown and commercial district revitalization projects.

Learn more about the Texas Downtown Association at www.TexasDowntown.org. Find out more about downtown Georgetown and the Georgetown Main Street Program at MainStreet.Georgetown.org.

For information about exhibits and classes at the Georgetown Art Center, go to www.GeorgetownArtCenterTX.org.

Collectible Ornament of Old Williamson County Jail

2014 ornament Old JailA limited-edition collectible brass Christmas ornament featuring the old historic Williamson County Jail goes on sale November 8. The cost of the ornament is $20, tax included. The eighth annual ornament sale is a project of the Georgetown Main Street Program.

The old Williamson County Jail at 312 Main Street was built of native limestone in 1888 at a cost of $22,000. The jail served Williamson County continuously from 1888 until 1990. The French Bastille style was unchanged during remodeling in 1934.

The old jail is used for an annual haunted house event each October to benefit the Williamson County Brown Santa program.

Only 300 of the limited-edition ornaments are available. Payments by cash, check, or credit are accepted.

Ornaments may be purchased at the Visitors Center at 103 E. Seventh Street on the downtown Square or at the Georgetown Art Center at 816 S. Main Street. Ornaments typically sell out each year.

All proceeds from the ornament sale fund the Light Up the Square campaign to add more holiday lighting in downtown Georgetown.

Main Street Façade and Sign Grants for Downtown Businesses

The Georgetown Main Street program has presented a number checks this year to businesses for Façade and Sign Grants. The Main Street Façade and Sign Fund is a matching grant program for commercial buildings in the historic downtown area. (Click on photos to see a larger version.)

ThunderCloud check 2-1000

ThunderCloud Subs at 814 S. Main Street received a $10,500 grant for an awning, façade work, and signs. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Bob Weimer, Cheryl Owens, Jim Wilson, Vicki Jackimiec, Nathan Wolfers (general manager), Marcy Urban, Nick Watkins (senior manager), Bethany Powell, Bill Hart, Julie Laderach, and Shelly Hargrove. Find out more about ThunderCloud Subs at ThunderCloud.com.

Camille's check-2-1000

Camille’s Unique Apparel at 706 S. Austin Avenue received a $300 grant for new signs. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Bob Weimer, Julie Laderach, Shelly Hargrove, Cheryl Owens, Bethany Powell, Camille Sweezy (Camille’s owner), Dick Sweezy (co-owner), Vicki Jackimiec, Jim Wilson, Bill Hart, and Marcy Urban. Find out more about Camille’s at www.CamillesLadiesApparel.com.

Hughes trust check 2-1000

The owners of the Dimmit Building at 719 S. Main Street received an $8,000 grant for an awning, exterior painting, and façade work. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Marcy Urban, Shelly Hargrove, Bill Hart, Ellen Hughes (owner), Jim Wilson, Coco Ledyard (owner), Julie Laderach, and Vicki Jackimiec.

Sweet Lemon Inn check 2-1000

Sweet Lemon Inn at 812 S. Church Street received a $10,500 grant for signs, exterior painting, and façade work. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Marcy Urban, Shelly Hargrove, Rachel Cummins (owner), Bill Hart, Julie Laderach, Vicki Jackimiec, and Jim Wilson. Find out more about Sweet Lemon Inn at www.SweetLemonInn.com.

Goodwater check 2-1000

Goodwater Wealth Management Group of Raymond James at 103 E. Eighth Street received a $424 grant for signs. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Marcy Urban, Bill Hart, Angie Spinner (registered client associate), Greg Bowden (vice president), Jaynie Guerrero (registered client associate), Rod Dahl (vice president), Doug Noble (vice president), Jim Wilson, and Shelly Hargrove. Find out more about Goodwater Wealth Management Group at GoodwaterWealth.com.

Southern Hippie check 2-1000

Southern Hippie at 809 S. Main Street received a $3,550 grant for an awning, exterior painting, and façade work. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Bill Hart, Marcy Urban, Elizabeth Lockhart (owner), Jim Wilson, and Shelly Hargrove. Find out more about Southern Hippie at ShopSouthernHippie.com.

The Main Street Façade and Sign Fund provides reimbursement grants to business owners in the historic downtown area for a portion of improvements made to building facades and new signs. Sign matching grants are for up to $500 and façade matching grants are up to $10,000 for exterior work on a historic building.

Georgetown Main Street promotes historic preservation and economic development efforts in the historic downtown. Main Street is a program of the City of Georgetown Division of Downtown and Community Services. Learn more at mainstreet.georgetown.org.

Main Street Grants to Center for Cognitive Ed, J. Paul Aubin

The Georgetown Main Street program recently presented checks for matching grants for new signs and building façade work at the Center for Cognitive Education and at J. Paul Aubin Real Estate. The Main Street Façade and Sign Fund is a matching grant program for commercial buildings in the historic downtown area.

The Center for Cognitive Education at 503 S. Main Street offers counseling and assistance programs to help people develop and maintain responsible patterns in living. The center received a $7,345 check for a portion of the cost of building façade improvements and signs.

Dean Eddy check-b-1200

Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Marcy Urban, Jim Wilson, David Kellerman, Dean Eddy, Cindy Harrington, Linda McCalla, and Shelly Hargrove.

J. Paul Aubin Real Estate at 810 S. Main Street is a real estate office with nine agents serving the Georgetown and Austin metro area. J. Paul Aubin Real Estate received an $8,133 check for a portion of the cost of renovating the building façade and new signs.

Aubin check-b-800

Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Marcy Urban, Linda McCalla, Jim Wilson, Joseph Aubin, Dora Aubin, David Kellerman, Cindy Harrington, and Shelly Hargrove.

Dean Eddy facade-b-600The building facade for the Center for Cognitive Education is pictured at left.

The Main Street Façade and Sign Fund provides reimbursement grants to business owners in the historic downtown area for a portion of improvements made to building facades and new signs.

Sign matching grants are for up to $500 and façade matching grants are up to $10,000 for exterior work on a historic building.

Dean Eddy sign-b-400Georgetown Main Street promotes historic preservation and economic development efforts in the historic downtown.

Main Street is a program of the City of Georgetown Division of Downtown and Community Services.

Learn more at mainstreet.georgetown.org.

Georgetown 3rd on Best American Suburbs Ranking

A recent analysis of 75 cities in the top 25 U.S. metro areas ranked Georgetown third on the list. The top ten list of America’s Best Suburbs, placing Georgetown at no. 3 in the country, was done by Movoto, a real estate company in California. The ranking was based on several factors including shopping, dining, and entertainment offerings as well as cost of living, low crime, education, and employment.

The article notes that Georgetown’s crime rate is 45 percent below the national average and that the cost of living is nearly 9 percent lower than the national average. The article also cites Georgetown’s low student-to-teacher ratio.

Movoto provided an explanation of the appeal of the major metro cities on the list. “These smaller cities and towns offer proximity to everything their larger neighbors have to offer, while oftentimes being safer and less crowded.”

“This ranking is a wonderful tribute to our history, our vitality, our values and our fantastic citizens,” says Mayor George Garver. “Good schools, good public safety personnel, and a great living environment make this city very desirable. We take pride in this ranking knowing that others have discovered what we already know about Georgetown—it’s a great place to live.”

The ranking was based on an analysis of data from sources such as the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

To see the list of the 10 best American suburbs, as well as the full ranking of metro 75 cities, go to http://www.movoto.com/blog/top-ten/best-suburban-cities-in-america.

Main Street Grants: Co-Op 78626, Rough and Ready, Gumbo’s

The Georgetown Main Street program recently presented checks for matching grants for new signs or building façade work at 78626 Co-op, Rough and Ready Antiques, and Gumbo’s restaurant. The Main Street Façade and Sign Fund is a matching grant program for commercial buildings in the historic downtown area.

Co-op check 2b-600

The Co-Op 78626 is a cooperative business space at 308 W. Eighth Street including The Shop at The Co-Op, which offers a variety of handmade clothing and accessory items, as well as a salon and workspaces (www.TheCoopTX.com). The Co-Op 78626 received a $1,400 check for a portion of the cost of building façade improvements. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Marcy Urban, Jim Wilson, Faith Clark, David Kellerman, and Shelly Hargrove.

Rough and Ready check-b-600

Rough and Ready Antiques at 602 S. Main Street has a wide variety of antiques and vintage items. Rough and Ready received a $3,570 check for a portion of the cost of painting the exterior of the building. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Jim Wilson, Marcy Urban, Becky Sundbeck, Shelly Hargrove, and David Kellerman.

Gumbos check 1b-600

Gumbo’s restaurant at 701 S. Main Street offers Cajun and Creole cuisine as well as steaks and pastas. Gumbo’s received a $500 check for a portion of the cost of new signs. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are David Kellerman, Marcy Urban, Shuler Page, Matt Crader, Shelly Hargrove, and Jim Wilson.

Co-op front-b-400The Main Street Façade and Sign Fund provides reimbursement grants to business owners in the historic downtown area for a portion of improvements made to building facades and new signs.

Sign matching grants are for up to $500 and façade matching grants are up to $10,000 for exterior work on a historic building.

Georgetown Main Street promotes historic preservation and economic development efforts in the historic downtown. Main Street is a program of the City of Georgetown Division of Downtown and Community Services. Learn more at mainstreet.georgetown.org.

Rough and Ready front-b-600

Above is Rough and Ready Antiques, which received a grant for painting the exterior.

Gumbos front-400At right  is Gumbo’s restaurant which received a grant for signs.

Main Street Grants: Hummingbird Hollow, Artisans Connect

The Georgetown Main Street program recently presented checks to reimburse a portion of the cost for new signs at Hummingbird Hollow and Artisans Connect. The Main Street Façade and Sign Fund is a matching grant program for commercial buildings in the historic downtown area.

Hummingbird check-b-640

Hummingbird Hollow is a boutique with gifts, women’s apparel, and accessories at 824 S. Austin Avenue (www.hummingbirdhollow.biz). Hummingbird Hollow received at $500 check for a portion of the cost of new signs. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Marcy Urban, Cindy Harrington, Jim Wilson, Trisha Tallman, Erland Schulze, David Kellerman, Shelly Hargrove, Julie Laderach, and John Marler.

Artisans check-b-640

Artisans Connect Gallery at 122 E. Eighth Street features ceramic, metal, glass, and mixed media pieces as well as paintings and jewelry by Central Texas artists (www.artisansconnect.net). Artisans Connect Gallery received a $500 check for a portion of the cost of new signs. Pictured (left to right) in the photo are Marcy Urban, Julie Laderach, John Marler, Jim Wilson, Trisha Tallman, Diane Gaume, Cindy Harrington, Shelly Hargrove, and David Kellerman.

Hummingbird signs-b-400The Main Street Façade and Sign Fund provides reimbursement grants to business owners in the historic downtown area for a portion of improvements made to building facades and new signs.

Sign matching grants are for up to $500 and façade matching grants are up to $10,000 for exterior work on a historic building.

The building facade and signs for Hummingbird Hollow are shown at left.

The storefront and signs for Artisans Connect Gallery are shown below.

Georgetown Main Street promotes historic preservation and economic development efforts in the historic downtown. Main Street is a program of the City of Georgetown Division of Downtown and Community Services.

Artisans sign-b-400Learn more at mainstreet.georgetown.org.

Main Street Grants to ReImagine and Avalon Monuments

The Georgetown Main Street program recently presented checks to reimburse a portion of the cost for new signs at ReImagine and Avalon Monuments. The Main Street Façade and Sign Fund is a matching grant program for commercial buildings in the historic downtown area.

Re-Imagine2b-600

ReImagine is an antique and home furnishings store at 1006 S. Austin Avenue. ReImagine received a $322 check for a portion of the cost of new signs for the business. Pictured (left to right) in the photo above are Janice Jacoby, Marcy Urban, John Marler, Janis Shields, Amneris Castillo, Jim Wilson, and Shelly Hargrove.

Avalon1b-600

Avalon Monuments at 1004 S. Austin Avenue provides custom monuments, headstones, portraits, memorials, and cremation urns, as well as the etching of final death dates (www.avalonmonuments.com). Avalon Monuments received a $500 check for a portion of the cost of new signs for the business. Pictured (left to right) in the photo above are Janice Jacoby, Janis ReImagine sign-b-400Shields, Cindy Harrington, Lois Townsend, John Marler, Larry Townsend, Jim Wilson, Marcy Urban, and Shelly Hargrove.

The Main Street Façade and Sign Fund provides reimbursement grants to business owners in the historic downtown area for a portion of improvements made to building facades and new signs.

Sign matching grants are for up to $500 and façade matching grants are up to $10,000 for exterior work on a historic building.

Avalon-sign-b-400Georgetown Main Street promotes historic preservation and economic development efforts in the historic downtown.

Main Street is a program of the City of Georgetown Division of Downtown and Community Services. Learn more at mainstreet.georgetown.org.

Georgetown Main Street Program Recognized

For the 11th consecutive year, the Georgetown Main Street Program was recognized with national accreditation. The honor was conferred last week at the winter meeting of the Texas Historical Commission’s Texas Main Street Program. Georgetown was one of 67 accredited Main Street programs in Texas that were recognized at the January 30 conference in Llano.

state-recognition-Farst-Hargrove-b“It really is a notable accomplishment to be recognized in this way, especially for those programs that do it year after year,” said Debra Farst, Texas Main Street Program state coordinator. “Incremental progress that leads to comprehensive success is at the core of the preservation-based Main Street model and that is exactly what these programs are showing. Each program is recognized for their own local effort. They are truly real places telling real stories.”

Accredited programs show above average performance in ten categories on an annual report. Selection criteria focus on planning, partnerships, staffing, volunteer effort, preservation ethic, training, and program assessment through reporting. The state office also works with programs throughout the year by providing various services based upon local needs.

Pictured in the photo are Debra Farst, Texas Main Street Program state coordinator, Shelly Hargrove, Georgetown Main Street Program manager, and Brad Patterson, division director, Community Heritage Development Division, Texas Historical Commission.

In 2012, the Georgetown Main Street Program awarded $24,400 in façade and sign reimbursement grants to eight downtown businesses. Events and programs in 2012 include the Georgetown Swirl wine and food event, the Main Street 30th Anniversary Dinner Celebration, the Light Up the Square holiday lighting campaign, and the annual collectible ornament sale. Since 2003, the Georgetown Main Street Program has awarded $226,995 in façade and sign reimbursement grants to downtown businesses.

For more information about the Georgetown Main Street Program, go to mainstreet.georgetown.org. For more information on the Texas Historical Commission’s Main Street program, visit www.thc.state.tx.us.